Design Research Seminar (Sparkman)

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Lexicon 3

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PLACE is entangled with issues of territory, identity, and boundary. Place is a phenomenal condition that emerges with the marriage of an ideology, its spatial practices, and an expressive and resonant form. A design intervention must resonate with the fullness of place.
preconditions (n) – the enduring geological, material, and social conditions of earth, mountain, and river.
“The earth is our world city. the sacred mountain is our home. They are ordered and governed with the urban elements of the city, combining to create a foundatino for an evolving urban terrain where form and material dreams are of equal value.” in William Morrish, Civilizing Terrains: Mountains, Mounds, and Mesas (San Francisco: William Stout, 1989), ii.
excavate/replace (v) – to remove ground, replacing it with a physical construction or perceived void.
“In the case of the modern terrain the materials come from the quarries and cliffs in distant locations… As we continue to build these grand pinnacles and peaks, one wonders; what is becoming of all the sites of excavation? In the urban terrain the building of each new mountain results in the making of a new geomorphic excavation.” in William Morrish, Civilizing Terrains: Mountains, Mounds, and Mesas (San Francisco: William Stout, 1989), 5.
time, weathering, and memory (n) – often, Modernists did not account for weathering and its effects on construction and memory. Due to time and weathering, places now exist in our imagination as forgotten layers beneath the city. Designers must be attentive to how buildings weather, how memories weather, and how collective memories of past cities manifest themselves in place.
Mohsen Mostafavi and David Leatherbarrow, On Weathering : the Life of Buildings In Time (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1993).
Colin Rowe and Fred Koetter, Collage City (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1978), 1-4.

Written by csparkman

September 30, 2011 at 12:10 am

Posted in Uncategorized

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