Design Research Seminar (Sparkman)

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Lexicon 7

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soft city (n) – like the emergent city: a city that is the cumulative sum of our interactions and interconnections. The city exhibits a soft character: subject to its inhabitants’ lives, dreams, and interpretations.
Jonathan Raban, Soft City (Glasgow: William Collins, 1974), 9-16.
the right to the city (n) – first proclaimed by Lefebvre as a “demand… [for] transformed and renewed access to urban life,” and redefined by Harvey as “the individual liberty to access urban resources: it is a right to change ourselves by changing the city.”
Henri Lefebvre, Writings on Cities (Cambridge: Blackwell, 1968), 158.
“The question of what kind of city we want cannot be divorced from that of what kind of social ties, relationship to nature, lifestyles, technologies, and aesthetic values we desire. The right to the city is far more than the individual liberty to access urban resources: it is a right to change ourselves by changing the city. It is, moreover, a common rather than an individual right since this transformation inevitably depends upon the exercise of a collective power to reshape the processes of urbanization. The freedom to make and remake our cities and ourselves is, I want to argue, one of the most precious yet most neglected of our human rights.” in David Harvey, “The Right to the City,” New Left Review 53 (1998).
infra-urbanism (n) – the urban architecture of the sixties and seventies: urban slab development and the motorway, with the added dimension of depth. This underground city was for technical networks and public transportation (metro and motorways). However, underground public spaces had not been conceived.
Florence Bougnoux et al., Les Halles: Villes Intérieures (Marseille: Éditions Parenthèses, 2008), 16-18.
interior city (n) – an underground urbanism set at the confluence of a transportation node and a commercial shopping center. Some examples include: Rockafeller Center (New York City), Shinjuku (Tokyo), and La Ville Intérieure (Montréal). They exhibit all of the functional qualities of a consolidated city.
Florence Bougnoux et al., Les Halles: Villes Intérieures (Marseille: Éditions Parenthèses, 2008), 16-18.

Written by csparkman

October 28, 2011 at 1:16 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

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